Thursday 131010

“Helen”
3 Rounds for time of:
Run, 400 m
21 Kettlebell swings 24kg(16kg)
12 Pull-ups

Post times to comments and BTWB

The Three Amigos. Coming to CrossFit Verve soon.

 

The 1,000 rep problem – (Not originally by but brought to your attention) By Courtney Shepherd

As an athlete I constantly strive to have beautifully correct form and highly efficient movement. As a trainer I want the same thing for you the athlete when you come to my class. As we warm up to a WOD you can feel me eerily creeping around you, looking over your shoulder, staring at you, and then comes that moment when my voice resonates from behind “DIP INTO YOUR HEALS!”. Yeah, that’s right. I caught you. I caught you retreating from that correct form and highly efficient movement and I called you out on it. My favorite moment comes after when you return to your heals, execute a nice dip resulting in a fluid, almost weightless movement of the barbell. Then you look at me and say “Wow, that felt easy.” Yes it did, because you did it right. When we position our body correctly and move it through space maintaining that right position what results is beautifully correct form and highly efficient movement. Question: How do I maintain beautifully correct form and highly efficient movement without the constant loving reminder from an incredibly caring Verve trainer? Answer: Repetition. Backseat driver to first answer: Repetition of the beautifully correct form and highly efficient movement.

I was recently sent an article titled “The 1,000 Rep Problem” (click here to read it in full). This article highlights my point. Or maybe my point highlights this article. Either way you get the point, which is anything that’s worth doing right is worth doing right a lot, say like 1,000 times. 

“Yeah, the 1,000 rep problem. Let me explain what I’m talking about, although many of you already see where this is going. The 1,000 rep problem is the situation that exists when a lifter has finally found the correct technique of the SN or C&J. After tons of work and coaching, they’ve done it right. But now they have to do it right another 1,000 times to memorize that correct movement.

We’re talking about things like muscle memory, nervous system memorization of a specific movement, motor learning, that kind of stuff. Some people think of this as learning correct technique and then making it a habit. I don’t really see it as a habit. I think of it as learning correct technique and then continuing to do it right until you basically don’t know how to do it wrong anymore. Habits are just recurring behaviors, like peeing in the shower. You can stop doing those things any time you want. I’m talking about a more fanatical level of performance, where your body just instinctively executes a certain movement because that’s all it knows how to do.”

Fanatical level of performance?!? Whachu talkin’ bout Willis? I’m talking about not accepting that retreat into bad form, bad position, bad movement. I’m talking about taking the time, lightening the load, and getting into the right position not just once but over and over and over again. I’m talking about when you feel like “Wow, that was easy”, let’s do it  like that, again. 

“Now, here are a few extra notes about this:
– You only get the 1,000 rep problem after you’ve done it right for the first time. Your first correct rep was #1. Many of you haven’t even hit that one yet.
– Crappy lifts don’t count towards your accumulated total. So if you’ve done 287 correct lifts and then you have a workout where your technique is totally whacked and you wind up doing thirty sloppy snatches, you’re still at 287 at the end of the day.”

There is no better time to start then now. Rep number 1 here we come. Reps 2-1,000 we’ll be getting to you soon enough, we’ve got plenty of time. 

Do you want to learn from Matt Chan, Chris Spealler, and Eric O’Connor? Well my friends you can in just a few short weeks when they come to CrossFit Verve to teach the CrossFit Competitor’s Course. The Three Amigos will be here November 16th-17th. Register at www.crossfit.com.

Comments

  1. Jason A :

    I always knew you were staring at me.

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