Wednesday 130710

As many rounds as possible in 15 minutes of:
500m row
15 thrusters (115#/75#)

Post results to comments and BTWB.

IMG 9540 475x316 Wednesday 130710

Chalk bucket, tape, and a used, dirty sock laying around. Must


Work Your Weaknesses ~ Luke Palmisano

We are all different. Different make-up, different needs, different histories, different body types, different strength, weaknesses, ect. This is demonstrated in our training. For example, some time back, I was in the Australian Outback, being taught by an Aboriginal Ninja. He was trying to teach me to filet a wallaby with a single boomerang toss. It was hard! We both laughed heartily, as I had learned a couple of valuable lessons: throwing boomerangs was a weakness for me, and I was not Australian. See, we were different

If you have a weakness that continually haunts you in workouts, is there a plan of attack? Perhaps, yes. First of all, try to view your weakness not by the movement that is difficult, but by the muscle group needed to perform said movement. For instance, let's say a certain athlete has difficulty with workouts that have deadlifts in them. Is this because the deadlift itself is a hard movement? Could be. Most likely though, deadlifts are difficult because the muscles required to perform them aren't developed enough, i.e., the posterior chain muscle group. So, what to do? You must try to isolate the muscles needed to lift a weight off of the ground and make them stronger by using accessory exercises that target those areas. In addition, you need to be creative. That is, you want to change up those exercises often to continually stimulate the body and make it adapt. So here is a general plan: Concentrate on the movement and area of weakness 1-2 times/week. In addition to the movement itself and different variations of it (whether it be the deadlift, handstand push-up, pull-up, front squat, ect.) add in 2-3 accessory movements. This may take some research on your part, because, like we talked about, you want to change and rotate those accessory exercises. Then, be patient. We have weaknesses for a reason; we are really weak in certain areas (my logic is astounding, I know). It may take time to chip away, as it were, at that weakness in order to make progress. Eventually, the person who improves their weaknesses will see themselves thrive during all kinds of different workouts that are thrown at them at their respective CrossFit gym.

In the end, I focused on my boomerang toss 1-2 times/week, as well as some accessory training. I added volume, and slowly saw improvements. A year later, I returned to the site of my previous failure. I fillet'd a wallaby on a single toss, and several dingos that, from intel we had received, were about to attack a small village. Maybe next time, dingos. 

  • On Monday, Sept. 2nd, Strength Specific Seminar will be holding a Silver Level seminar (the Bronze level will be on Aug. 31st at CrossFit Eminence, just north of us). This is a fantastic event with lots of hands on training, and opportunities to lift in front of expert eyes. The SSS website can be found here. 

 

Comments

  1. Ali :

    Between Eric's post on frozen water yesterday and Luke's post today on the boomerang toss…I have had quite the chuckle!  Funny posts boys!  I enjoy them!

Speak Your Mind

*